ShotSpotter has just announced the launch of the Data for Good program.

Data for Good is a community-based program that shares precision data about where and when gun violence occurs so non-law enforcement organizations can provide prompt interventions to residents in need of services and support.

According to the Annals of Internal Medicine, survivors of firearm injury have a 51% increase in psychiatric disorders and an 85% increase in substance use disorders. Individuals exposed to ongoing gunfire incidents can experience PTSD-like symptoms and require immediate follow-up. Local and national organizations in communities across the country help to address this problem through a variety of means, including violence intervention and prevention, counseling and economic assistance.

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ShotSpotter’s Data for Good program helps law enforcement customers identify offices of violence prevention, schools, city and county public health departments and other community organizations that would receive gunfire data and analytics including heat maps and dashboards. These tools indicate where gunfire and potential trauma may be occurring so the appropriate community resources can be deployed to offer timely and lasting support and help address the core issues that drive crime.

“ShotSpotter technology is known as a tool for helping law enforcement save lives and improve the safety of communities we serve nationwide. I’m excited to now share that our Data for Good program will extend this positive impact more deeply into violence prevention and community assistance work,” said Ralph A. Clark, President and CEO of ShotSpotter. “We hope to see this grow from the handful of community organizations that currently utilize ShotSpotter gunfire data to hundreds of partners across the country that deploy their social, health and economic resources to the right places at the right times in order to help prevent violence.”

Read the full press release here.


Learn More About How We Assist Community Violence Intervention and Public Health Groups.