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CPD ShotSpotter gunshot detection goes live

August 16, 2017
Local 12: Cincinnati

CINCINNATI (WKRC) - Cincinnati Police can now tell exactly where people are shooting guns almost instantly.

A short time ago the department went live with “ShotSpotter.

"It's hard to be considered data based policing if you only have 20 percent of the data. This is where it will fill-in the 80 percent of shots fired in Avondale,” said Cincinnati Police Lt. Col. Paul Neudigate.

That's where the ShotSpotter sensors are set up now. It's been capturing data the past 24 hours, recording shots fired in two locations.

The first was on Young Street at 11:48 p.m. Tuesday night. ShotSpotter gave the exact location as 2058 Young Street.

Gunshots no one heard or just didn't report.

Then again at 5:16 a.m. Wednesday morning, a single shot on north Fred Shuttlesworth Circle near the tennis courts.

"Now we can focus on areas that we had shots fired overnight wouldn’t have known otherwise,” said Lt. Col. Paul Neudigate.

No one reported the early morning gunshot either. But an officer went there and found the shell casing.

"For them to go back and discover shell casing… enter into NIBEN… incredible,” said Lt. Col. Paul Neudigate.

NIBEN is a system that compares empty shell casings from different shootings scenes, sometimes linking them to the same gun, and then to the shooter.

Starting Wednesday night, officers will be notified of ShotSpotter activations within seconds.

Instead of searching for the location they'll know exactly where to go, the shooter might still be there and witnesses too.

"Going to knock on doors, let them know we care about each gunfire incident, whether someone struck by a bullet or not, it's unacceptable in this city,” said Lt. Col. Paul Neudigate.

Officers trained in ShotSpotter will log into the system on their smartphones and the computers in their patrol cars. Communications will also be logged in.

The hope is that ShotSpotter will help reduce gun violence in and around Avondale.

If that's the case, sensors could go up in other neighborhoods.